Special Symposium published: “The Impact of Agnes: Reflections on Garfinkel’s Notion of the Managed Achievement of Sex and Gender” #sssi #emca

At the 2015 ASA Conference in Chicago, the ASA Section Ethnomethodology & Conversation Analysis organised a Thematic Session related to Harold Garfinkel’s famous paper on the “Passing and the managed achievement of sex status in an intersexed person”; the paper was published in Garfinkel’s (1967) Studies in Ethnomethodology.

The session “The Impact of Agnes: Reflections on Garfinkel’s Notion of the Managed Achievement of Sex and Gender” organised by Thomas DeGloma and Robert Dingwall as discussant featured Sarah Fenstermaker (University of Michigan), Jodi O’Brien (Seattle University), and Kristen Schilt (University of Chicago).

This week, the three contributions to the Special Session have been published in a Special Symposium in Symbolic Interaction:

Kristen Schilt “The Importance of Being Agnes

Jodi O’Brien “Seeing Agnes: Notes on a Transgender Biocultural Ethnomethodology

Sarah Fenstermaker “The Turn from “What” to “How”: Garfinkel’s Reach beyond Description

Posted in Ethnomethodology, Garfinkel, gender, interationism | Leave a comment

More on Mead:Peter M. Hall’s Review of “George Herbert Mead’s Concept of Society:A Critical Reconstruction” by J.F. Côte

J.F.Côte has recently published a new interpretation of George Herbert Mead’s life and work. This book has not been reviewed by Peter M.Hall who states that this book is “a “must-read” for all those who claim identities as symbolic interactionists, who teach theory, who write introductory book with the obligatory three theories section, and all those who still believe we are micro, ahistorical, astructural, and power-less.” The review has just been published on Early View of Symbolic Interaction

Posted in Book Review, interactionism, Mead | Leave a comment

“The Importance of Being Agnes” on Early View of Symbolic Interaction #sssi #sociology

At the 2015 ASA Conference in Chicago, the ASA Section Ethnomethodology & Conversation Analysis organised a Thematic Session related to Harold Garfinkel’s famous paper on the “Passing and the managed achievement of sex status in an intersexed person”; the paper was published in .Garfinkel’s (1967) Studies in Ethnomethodology.

The session “The Impact of Agnes: Reflections on Garfinkel’s Notion of the Managed Achievement of Sex and Gender” organised by Thomas DeGloma and Robert Dingwall as discussant featured Sarah Fenstermaker (University of Michigan), Jody O’Brien (Seattle University), and Kristen Schilt (University of Chicago).

Today, the first of the three presentations from that event, Kristen Schilt’s “The Importance of Being Agnes” was published on Early View of Symbolic Interaction.

Posted in Analysis, Ethnomethodology, Garfinkel | Leave a comment

New Article on Early view: “Stories of Non-becoming” #sssi #sociology #identity

By taking asexual lives as an example Susie Scott, Liz McDonnell and Matt Dawson explore the negation of identity and the suspension of a trajectory. Their article “Stories of Non-becoming: Non-issues, Non-events and Non-identities in Asexual Lives” has just been published on early view. Click on the image below to be directed to the article.

scott-et al

Posted in Analysis, gender, identity, Journal, SSSI | Leave a comment

Research Paper in the News: Junhow Wei on American Idol

Junhow Wei’s article ““I’m the Next American Idol”: Cooling Out, Accounts, and Perseverance at Reality Talent Show Auditions” that has just been published in the February 2016 Issue of Symbolic Interaction has been picked up by Tracy Swartz (@tracyswartz) from the Chicago Tribune. Swarz writes, “Wei, a sociologist at the University of Pennsylvania, interviewed 43 other “Idol” contestants to study how fame-seekers deal with rejection”. 

Click here for Tracy Swartz’s piece in the Chicago Tribune. 

Posted in #sssi, ethnography, everyday life, interactionism, Journal, research paper | Leave a comment

February 2016 Issue of Symbolic Interaction is OUT! #sssi #sociology

Symbolic Interaction Volume 39, Number 1 – February 2016

CONTENTS

ARTICLES

‘‘I’m the Next American Idol’’: Cooling Out, Accounts, and Perseverance at Reality Talent Show Auditions by Junhow Wei

‘‘I am a cheerleader, but secretly I deal drugs’’ Authenticity through Concealment and Disclosure by Michelle Smirnova

Basic-Level Categories, Mirror Neurons, and Joint-Attention Schemes: Three Points of Intersection between G.H. Mead and Cognitive Science by Ryan McVeigh

Comiendo Bien: The Production of Latinidad through the Performance of Healthy Eating among Latino Immigrant Families in San Francisco by Air´ın D. Mart´ınez

‘‘Tell Something About the Pictures’’: The Content and the Process of Autobiographical Work Among Scrapbookers by Stephanie Medley-Rath

Face and the Dynamics of Its Construction: A Relational and Multilayered Perspective by Greti-Iulia Ivana

A Guide to Training Your Own Horses: The Flaneur Appproach and Erving Goffman’s Uninhibited Research Practices in Sociology by Michael Dellwing

EDITORS’ INVITATION

Goffman and Empirical Research by Philip Manning

 

BOOK REVIEWS

Black Boxes, Social Processes, and the Problem of Relativity: Reasoning, Method, and Getting Research Done by Scott Grills

An Instructive Return to Laboratory Ethnography by Götz Hoeppe

Local Productions of Visual Orders: Describing Science Seeing Mars by Neil Jenkings

On the Pragmatic Conception of Mind by Jirˇı´ Sˇubrt

Stuck in the 60s (and That’s Not a Bad Thing): Revitalizing the Ethno Study of Juvenile Court by Gregory Matoesian

Further Steps toward a Sociology of Attention by Dirk vom Lehn

Posted in #sssi, Goffman, interactionism, Journal | Leave a comment

New Publications on Early View (updated) #sssi #sociology

New articles and book reviews have been published on Early View. They include articles by Dellwing and Manning on Goffman and many more. To access them please go here:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1533-8665/earlyview

 

 

Posted in #sssi, interactionism, Journal, research paper | Leave a comment