New Article: “The Everyday Drama of Coproduction in Community Mental Health Services” by Sine Kirkegaard #sssi #sociology #healthservices #welfareby

Current welfare policy encourages “coproduction” between citizens and welfare workers so that “lay expertise” effectively becomes part of the provision of services. Drawing on fieldwork from Danish mental health services, this article analyzes how expertise and authority are organized and performed in a network linking welfare workers and users as well as new participants (e.g., volunteers) and artifacts.

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SSSI Members can download the article by clicking the image below or HERE. To join SSSI and subscribe to Symbolic Interaction from $35 (£30) please click HERE.

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New Article: “Orchestrating Multi‐sensoriality in Tasting Sessions: Sensing Bodies, Normativity, and Language” by Lorena Mondada #sssi #sociology #interaction #senses

In light of the burgeoning interest in the sociology of the senses symbolic interactionist also have shown a growing concern with studies of how the senses feature in people’s social life. Relatively few studies however explore how the senses, sense perception and the sensory experience of the world are embedded within the social organisation of action. A forthcoming Special Issue entitled “The Senses in Interaction” co-edited by Will Gibson and Dirk vom Lehn will address this gap in research.

Lorenza Mondada’s “Orchestrating Multi‐sensoriality in Tasting Sessions: Sensing Bodies, Normativity, and Language” is the first article form this Special Issue that we have published on Early View of our journal.

SSSI Members can download the article by clicking the image below or HERE. To join SSSI and subscribe to Symbolic Interaction from $35 (£30) please click HERE.

Mondada

 

 

Posted in interactionism, sociology, Special Issue, SSSI, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Introduction to Special Issue on “Stigma” #sssi #goffman #sociology

In 2018, Thaddaeus Mueller organized the Couch-Stone Symposium/European SSSI Conference at Lancaster University. The title of the conference was “‘Whose Side Are We On?’ Power, Stigma, Transgression, and Exclusion in Everyday Life”. Based on contribution to the conference Thaddaeus Mueller has put together a Special Issue of Symbolic Interaction. We have just published Mueller’s introduction to the Special Issue.

SSSI Members can download the Introduction to the Special Issue by clicking the image below or HERE. To join SSSI and subscribe to Symbolic Interaction from $35 (£30) please click HERE.

Mueller

Posted in Goffman, Stigma, Symbolic Interaction | Leave a comment

New Article: “The Body in Mind: Mead’s Embodied Cognition” by Ryan McVeigh #sssi #body #sociology #Mead

Over the past few decades sociology has increasingly explored how the body relates to the social. This has been reflected in debates in the burgeoning sociology of health and illness. As Ryan McVeigh’s article “The Body in Mind: Mead’s Embodied Cognition” that we have just published on Early View of Symbolic Interaction shows, these debates also resonate within interactionism.

SSSI Members can download the article by clicking the image below or HERE. To join SSSI and subscribe to Symbolic Interaction from $35 (£30) please click HERE.

McVeigh

Posted in #sssi, Analysis, Journal, Mead | Leave a comment

Review of Hammersley’s “The Radicalism of Ethnomethodology” by K. Neil Jenkings #emca #sociology #sssi

There is a burgeoning interest in ethnomethodology and conversation analysis. This growing interest is reflected in the growth of participants in EMCA conferences and publications that add to the body of literature in the field as well as by critical evaluations of EMCA. One such critical evaluation has recently been published by Martyn Hammersley. His book “The Radicalism of Ethnomethodology” has just been reviewed by K. Neil Jenkings.

SSSI Members can download the review by clicking the image below or HERE. To join SSSI and subscribe to Symbolic Interaction from $35 (£30) please click HERE.

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Posted in Book Review, book reviews, Ethnomethodology | Leave a comment

New Article: “Liminal Stigma and Disaligning Activity” by E.O. Silva and MB Flynn #sssi #sociology

We have just published Eric O. Silva and Matthew B. Flynn’s article entitled “Liminal Stigma and Disaligning Activity: Online Comments about Trump’s Family Separation Policy” on early view of Symbolic Interaction.

SSSI Members can download the article by clicking the image below or HERE. To join SSSI and subscribe to Symbolic Interaction from $35 (£30) please click HERE.

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New Book Review: Erin Reinisch reviews “Courting the Community” by Christine Zozula #sssi #bookreview #sociology #law

In Courting the Community, Christine Zozula draws on ethnographic data gathered during her fieldwork at Greenville Community Court (GCC) to examine the relationship between culture, organizational legitimacy, and punishment. Erin Reinisch (University of Nevada, LAs Vegas) has reviewed Zozula’s book and argues that “in a time where the notion of community is shifting due to the mediating forces of technology, political polarization, and impersonal bureaucratic institutions, community courts offer enticing promises that, as Zozula illustrates, they are ill‐equipped to fulfill”.

SSSI Members can download the review by clicking the image below or HERE. To join SSSI and subscribe to Symbolic Interaction from $35 (£30) please click HERE.

reinisch-zozula

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Just out: “Understanding Everyday Life: Generic Social Processes and the Pursuit of Transcontextuality” by Scott Grills #sssi #sociology #management

Recently, Scott Grills and Robert Prus published their book “Management Motifs” that Dawn Norris reviewed for Symbolic Interaction earlier this year. Scott Grills now has published an article in our journal titled “Understanding Everyday Life: Generic Social Processes and the Pursuit of Transcontextuality” that continues the argument made in the book. By drawing on a series of ethnographic research projects , Grills offers a research agenda for engaging GSPs transcontextually. Specifically, he argues for extending the study of GSPs through the examination of management in everyday life, the creation of subcultural value, and the social construction of doubt.

Scott Grill’s article has just been published on Early View of Symbolic Interaction. SSSI Members can download the article by clicking the image below or HERE. To join SSSI and subscribe to Symbolic Interaction from $35 (£30) please click HERE.

Grills-SI

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Review Essay: Leslie Irvine on two books about interaction with insects #sssi #interaction

Leslie Irvine very known for her research on human-animal interaction has reviewed two books concerned with the relationship between human and insects.

“Human-Insect Interactions” By Sergey Govorushko (CRC Press, 2018)

“Buzz, Sting, Bite:Why We Need Insects” By Anne Sverdrup-Thygeson (Simon & Schuster, 2019)

She argues that Anne Sverdrup-Thygeson and Sergey Govorushko in their books “remind readers that insects do not exist solely to serve our interests. They have evolved to engage in what many people consider uniquely human activities, including agriculture, warfare, the division of labor, slavery, a caste system, architecture, and symbolic communication”.

SSSI Members can download the article by clicking the image below or HERE. To join SSSI and subscribe to Symbolic Interaction from $35 (£30) please click HERE.

Irvine

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New Article: “The Spirit of Blumer’s Method as a Guide to Sociological Discovery” #sssi #Blumer #sociology

In this article Michale Schwalbe explores Herbert Blumer’s methodological contribution to interactionism and sociology. Schwalbe argues that Blumer’s essay “The Methodological Position of Symbolic Interactionism” “voices a spirit of research that is ardently empirical, sociological, and creative”.

Michael Schwalbe’s article has just been published on Early View of Symbolic Interaction. SSSI Members can download the article by clicking the image below or HERE. To join SSSI and subscribe to Symbolic Interaction from $35 (£30) please click HERE.

 

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Blog Post re “Distributed Selves: Shifting Inequities of Impression Management in Couples Living with Dementia” by James Rupert Fletcher #sssi #sociology

Blog Post in regard to: James Rupert Fletcher 2019 (Online First). “Distributed Selves: Shifting Inequities of Impression Management in Couples Living with Dementia.” Symbolic Interaction.

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If you had dementia, would you tell people? This question is at the heart of my new paper in Symbolic Interaction, focusing on how couples with dementia negotiate impression management and the presentation of selves.

Among the many challenges that dementia presents, those affected can struggle to navigate the perceptions of other people. This is particularly challenging when couples disagree over how they would like to be seen by others. In my study, people with dementia wanted to conceal their diagnoses from other people, but carers wanted to be more open. People with dementia adopted various strategies for concealing their dementias, but as cognitive decline progressed, it became harder to hide. They became increasingly reliant on their carers to support their performances, and as carers gained greater influence, impression management shifted toward their preferences. This creeping inequity was made more problematic by symbolic and institutional responses to dementia, exacerbating tensions.

Diagnosis was one example of this. Diagnosis was typically driven by the carer, sometimes against the wishes of the person diagnosed. Discrepancies in the desirability of diagnosis reflect the different ways that diagnosis works for those affected. Participating carers described feeling validated by diagnosis and eliciting sympathies from others. There were also practical benefits, such as free gym classes and extra-fast car breakdown services. Conversely, participants with dementia were ashamed of having such an infamous condition, and suffered institutional disadvantages such as having their driving licenses revoked. Dementia placed everybody in unenviable positions, yet while diagnosis offered carers some meagre benefits, it compounded the situations of those with dementia.

This intensification of tensions in couples with dementia is important in the context of campaigns to promote diagnosis and awareness. Without effective treatments, the merits of this strategy depend on societal responses to dementia. In an ideal world, diagnosis would lead to services rather than shame, giving couples less reason to contest how best to engage with dementia. I hope this paper helps readers to reflect on the problems faced by couples with dementia, and to consider how we might ease some of them.

 

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Carley Geiss’s article “Exploring Cultural Conventions of Compassionate Healthcare through Virtual Narrative Ethnography” wins 2019 Couch Award! #sssi #sociology #award #Couch cc @carleygeiss

Carley Geiss (University of South Florida) won the 2019 Couch Award for her
work, “Exploring Cultural Conventions of Compassionate Healthcare through
Virtual Narrative Ethnography.”  In this study, Geiss illustrates how
public organizational narratives about compassionate healthcare reflect and
reinforce cultural systems of meaning.  Using virtual narrative ethnography
of Schwartz Center of Compassionate Healthcare, Geiss demonstrates the
construction of a formula story that operates through (1) characterization
of the “compassionate-worthy patient,” (2) a plot of empathetic connection
and compassionate action between patients and providers, and (3) morals
that communicate personal, clinical, and institutional benefits of
compassion in healthcare.
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Couch Award is an annual competition, open to students who submit papers
that (1) use a symbolic interactionist approach inInternet studies, (2)
explore the interface between deliberate social interaction and structured
(or automated)interactions sponsored or enacted by various technological
features, and(3) examine not only how identities, relations, and social
formations are negotiated through social interactions, but also how these
interactions are mediated further through the use or capacities of various
technologies.

For more information about Couch Award, please visit the Couch Center
website at https://eur03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=www.cccsir.com&data=01%7C01%7Cdirk.vom_lehn%40kcl.ac.uk%7Cba1736622f734d57fb1108d77e754ebc%7C8370cf1416f34c16b83c724071654356%7C0&sdata=zD%2FCvFr7IRz6iinE%2BzQbqh1ACgwKVwq3A7OKX8Ghxy0%3D&reserved=0, or contact Shing-Ling Sarina Chen at
sarina.chen@uni.edu.

Posted in Announcement, Award, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

New Book Review: Harvey Farberman’s “Essays in Interactionist Sociology” reviewed by David L. Altheide #sssi #sociology #interactionism #bookreview

Harvey A. Farberman is professor emeritus of social welfare policy at Stony Brook University. He was a co-founder and president of the Society for the Study of Symbolic Interaction, served as editor of the journal Symbolic Interaction, won the SSSI Distinguished Service Award, and was named an Annual Distinguished Lecturer. He also received the Albert Nelson Marquis Lifetime Achievement Award. “Essays in Interactionist Sociology” is a collection of Farberman’s work. We have just published that David L. Altheide’s review of the book on Early View of Symbolic Interaction.

SSSI Members can download the article by clicking the image below or HERE. To join SSSI and subscribe to Symbolic Interaction from $35 (£30) please click HERE.

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‘Unpacking the Unspoken’ by Stephanie Peña-Alves – #sssi @sijournal #myths #objects #object-mediated-communication #semiotics

Blog Post in regard to: Stephanie Peña-Alves. 2019 (Online First). “Outspoken Objects and Unspoken Myths: The Semiotics of Object‐Mediated Communication.” Symbolic Interaction

Unpacking the Unspoken

Stephanie Peña-Alves

There is a kind of romance to things understood, but unspoken, things “said,” but not uttered. Saying without saying is an exciting departure from the default of talk. What are these mysterious mute meanings and how do we achieve them? From who do these meanings emerge? Or should we ask, from what?

My article, “Outspoken Objects and Unspoken Myths,” deals with the many layers of “the unspoken, but meaningful” in everyday life, starting with the ordinary objects we engage with in interaction. Though we know objects are symbolically useful for informing and performing identity, less studied is how we weave objects’ abstract meanings into our regular interpersonal exchanges. This is a semiotic process I term object-mediated communication, whereby we move and “speak” with objects while speaking with others.

However, an object once symbolic is not always symbolic. Meanings surface and meanings fade. In other words, an object meaningful in one moment can be effectively meaningless in the next. Hence, objects are symbolically dormant until we activate their deeper meanings.

This article focuses on people’s use of doors in particular. Slamming doors, knocking on them, waiting at them, push them ever-so-slowly open – these are some of the ways people transmit important messages about their status, intentions, and affective dispositions in interaction. And yet there are even deeper layers of meaning at work here. Enacted in this door-mediated communication are what Barthes called mythologies about ownership and belonging, privacy, liminality, and the narrativity of interaction. Meanings, indeed, abound when doors appear in the midst of talk.

Who knew such simple gestures coupled with such ordinary objects could yield such explosions of meaning? This is the intriguing class of the unspoken I invite you to explore in this article.

Posted in #sssi, Analysis, Announcement, blog, semiotics, sociology, SSSI, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

2019 Maines Award for Schrock, McCabe, and Vaccaro’s paper “Narrative Manhood Acts” #sssi @sijournal #narrative

Douglas Schrock (Florida State University), Janice McCabe (Dartmouth
College), and Christian Vaccaro (Indiana University of Pennsylvania) won
the 2019 Maines Award for their work published in Symbolic Interaction, “Narrative Manhood Acts: BattererIntervention Program Graduates’ TragicRelationships”  In this
article, the authors analyze how twenty graduates of a Batterer Intervention Program constructed autobiographical stories about their relationships with women they assaulted.  They focus on the presentation of gendered selves via narrative manhood acts, which they define as self-narratives that signify membership in the category “man” and the possession of a masculine self.  Their study demonstrates the usefulness of narrative analysis for research on batterers’ accounts and manhood acts, and also shows how oppositional genre-making can be a method to resist organizational narratives.

Couch Center wishes to thank the hard work of the Maines Award Review
Committee members to make the award evaluation posssible—Elaine Jenks (West
Chester University), William Rawlins  (Ohio University), Jim Thomas
(Northern Illinois University) and Jeff Ulmer (Pennsylvania State
University).

The Maines Award is an annual competition, open to both students and the
faculty who submit papers that (1) interpret or address Maines’ pragmatist
approaches, (2) apply Maines’ narrative concepts to a social/communication
event, (3) develop aspects of Maines’ scholarship in new directions, or (4)
integrate the humanistic development of narrative and Maines’ pragmatist
conceptual and theoretical direction.  For more information about Maines
Award, please visit the Couch Center website at https://eur03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=www.cccsir.com&data=01%7C01%7Cdirk.vom_lehn%40kcl.ac.uk%7Ced802d43a14c4c6d18a308d771dbf364%7C8370cf1416f34c16b83c724071654356%7C0&sdata=7%2FAYT5AA%2F4mewSx4c5XiE7KUNow8sBopeqeUfR5Uluo%3D&reserved=0, or

contact
Shing-Ling Sarina Chen at sarina.chen@uni.edu.

Posted in Announcement, sociology, SSSI, Symbolic Interaction | Leave a comment

New Article: “Distributed Selves” by James Rupert Fletcher (@JamesRuFletcher) #sssi #sociology #gerontology #dementia

In his article “Distributed Selves: Shifting Inequities of Impression Management in Couples Living with Dementia” James Rupert Fletcher explores impression management of couples living with dementia.

The article has just been published on Early View of Symbolic Interaction. SSSI Members can download the article by clicking the image below or HERE. To join SSSI and subscribe to Symbolic Interaction from $35 (£30) please click HERE.

 

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New Article: “Surgical Identity Play: The Anatomy Lab Revisited” by A. H. Vinson @ahvinson #sssi #sociology #anatomy #identity

In her article “Surgical Identity Play: The Anatomy Lab Revisited” Alexandra H. Vinson shows show that the anatomy lab experience is an important form of professional socialization because here students learn to employ surgical instruments, language, and dress, and begin to relate to each other as colleagues.

The article has just been published on Early View of Symbolic Interaction. SSSI Members can download the article by clicking the image below or HERE. To join SSSI and subscribe to Symbolic Interaction from $35 (£30) please click HERE.

vinson

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New Article: “Outspoken Objects and Unspoken Myths” by Stephanie Peña‐Alves #sssi #sociology #semiotics

In her article “Outspoken Objects and Unspoken Myths: The Semiotics of Object‐Mediated Communication” Stephanie Peña‐Alves proposes that objects lie symbolically dormant until their deeper collective significance is activated through their use in interaction. Thus, through her research Stephanie Peńa-Alves expands the scope of interactionist inquiry on human–nonhuman relations by moving beyond the dominant scholarly focus on identity. The semiotic approach foregrounds a distinct human–object phenomenon, a novel category of nonverbal communication, and important meaning‐making dynamics.

SSSI Members can download the article by clicking the image below or HERE. To join SSSI and subscribe to Symbolic Interaction from $35 (£30) please click HERE.

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Posted in #sssi, Analysis, semiotics | Leave a comment

New Article: Casey Scheibling “Doing Fatherhood Online” #sssi #sociology

In his article “Doing Fatherhood Online: Men’s Parental Identities, Experiences, and Ideologies on Social Media” Casey Scheibling explores how men write about fatherhood on the internet.

The article has just been published on Early View of Symbolic Interaction. SSSI Members can download the article by clicking the image below or HERE. To join SSSI and subscribe to Symbolic Interaction from $35 (£30) please click HERE.

Scheibling

Posted in Analysis, identity | Leave a comment

New Article: Avihu Shoshana “Love, Stigma, and Resistance” #sssi #love #sociology

We have just published Avihu Shoshana’s article “Love, Stigma, and Resistance: “Therapeutic Microaggressions” in a Prisoners’ Wives’ Support Group” on Early View of Symbolic Interaction.

SSSI Members can download the article by clicking the image below or HERE. To join SSSI and subscribe to Symbolic Interaction from $35 (£30) please click HERE.

Shoshana

Posted in #sssi, Analysis, Emotion | Leave a comment